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Front Range
No Ozone Action Day Alert in Effect

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This is the Front Range Air Pollution Forecast effective 4PM on Friday, August 26, 2016:

No Advisories for Ozone or any other pollutant are in effect until at least 4 p.m. on Saturday for the Front Range Urban Corridor from El Paso County north to Larimer and Weld counties, including the Denver-Boulder area, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins and Greeley.

Ozone will stay Good to Moderate throughout the Front Range region on Friday and Saturday due to mild temperatures and intermittent shower activity.

Should atmospheric conditions suggest increased ground-level ozone concentrations, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Regional Air Quality Council will issue an ozone advisory. In addition, if conditions warrant, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment will issue advisories for other pollutants. Check this website (http://colorado.gov/airquality/advisory.aspx) often for a report on current air quality conditions and to learn if an ozone action day alert is in effect.

For statewide conditions, forecasts and advisories, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/colorado_summary.aspx

The highest Ozone related AQI at 6 o'clock PM Mountain Standard Time on August 26, 2016, is 71 which indicates Moderate ozone air quality. It was recorded by the RFN ambient ozone monitor. Unusually sensitive individuals may experience respiratory symptoms. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion.

The highest Particulate Matter (PM2.5) related AQI at 6 o'clock PM Mountain Standard Time on August 26, 2016, is 54 which indicates Moderate Particulate Matter (PM2.5) air quality. It was recorded by the ADM ambient monitor. Respiratory symptoms possible in unusually sensitive individuals, possible aggravation of heart or lung disease in people with cardiopulmonary disease and older adults. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy exertion.


Front Range Air Quality Forecast & Colorado Smoke Outlook
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FRONT RANGE AIR QUALITY FORECAST:
Friday, August 26, 2016, 2:20 PM MDT

Ozone concentrations are expected to be in the Good to Moderate range on Friday and Saturday. Moderate concentrations of ozone on Friday are most likely to occur in the western suburbs of Denver. On Saturday Moderate concentrations of ozone are possible throughout the Front Range region. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion in those areas on Friday and Saturday from noon until 8 PM.

Fine Particulate Matter concentrations are expected to be in the Good to Moderate range on Friday and Saturday. Moderate concentrations of fine particulate matter will mainly be confined to the Denver metro area through Saturday morning. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy exertion within the Denver metro area until noon on Saturday.

Carbon Monoxide concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Friday and Saturday.

Nitrogen Dioxide concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Friday and Saturday.

Visibility is expected to be Good to Moderate on Saturday.

COLORADO SMOKE OUTLOOK:
Friday, August 26, 2016, 2:00 PM MDT

SMOKE FROM WILDFIRES:
The 37,403 acre Beaver Creek Wildfire is located in northwestern Jackson County approximately 24 miles northwest of Walden. The wind at the fire on Friday afternoon and evening will mainly be out of a west or northwesterly direction. Cool temperatures and scattered overnight showers will help to keep fire activity limited, however any storms that do develop may produce gusty and erratic winds that can send smoke in any direction. Drainage winds in the early morning hours on Saturday will cause smoke to reach lower terrain and may affect the area to the north of the community of Cowdrey and northward to the Wyoming state line.

The 16,562 acre Hayden Pass Wildfire is located in western Fremont County approximately 20 miles southeast of Salida. Lower temperatures will help to limit fire activity, however shower activity is expected to be limited on Friday evening and into Saturday. Drainage winds overnight may allow smoke to settle into low lying areas and may influence locations such as Coaldale and Texas Creek.

The 127 acre Lost Solar Wildfire located near the Rio Blanco/Garfield county line approximately 24 miles southwest of Meeker. Winds at the fire on Friday will mainly be out of a westerly direction. Cooler temperatures will help to limit fire activity on Friday evening. Scattered showers are possible overnight Friday and into the early hours of Saturday morning. This activity may produce gusty and erratic winds that could send smoke in any direction.

What if there is a wildfire or smoke in your area that is not reported above?

The focus of the Colorado Smoke Outlook is on large fires (e.g., greater than 100 acres in size). Nevertheless, smoke from smaller fires, prescribed fires, and/or smoke from new fires not yet known to CDPHE air quality meteorologists may cause locally heavy smoke. If there is smoke in your neighborhood, see the public health recommendations below.



Public health recommendations for areas affected by smoke: If smoke is thick or becomes thick in your neighborhood you may want to remain indoors. This is especially true for those with heart disease, respiratory illnesses, the very young, and the elderly. Fine particulates may reach the Unhealthy category where smoke is heavy. Consider limiting outdoor activity when moderate to heavy smoke is present. People with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion; everyone else should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion. Consider relocating temporarily if smoke is present indoors and is making you ill. IF VISIBILITY IS LESS THAN 5 MILES IN SMOKE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD, SMOKE HAS REACHED LEVELS THAT ARE UNHEALTHY.

For additional information about smoke, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/wildfire.aspx


Summer Ozone Program
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For an AQI value that considers all pollutants, please click here.

Ground-level ozone is a summertime air pollution problem that is created when other pollutants from sources like vehicle exhaust, paints, degreasing agents and cleaning fluids react with sunlight. Exposure to ground-level ozone can cause acute respiratory problems, reduced lung capacity and inflammation of lung tissues and can trigger asthma attacks.

Ground-level ozone should not be confused with the protective stratospheric ozone layer miles above the Earth's surface. This naturally-occurring ozone layer protects the Earth's surface from excessive ultra-violet radiation.

Do your share and be a part of the solution to the Denver-metropolitan area's summertime air pollution problems. These easy strategies will help reduce the harmful vapors that react in sunlight to create summertime air pollution:

At Home:

  • Tightly cap all solvents (paint thinners and strippers, degreasers, and some cleaning products). Solvents contain pollution-causing vapors.
  • Postpone painting, stripping and refinishing projects to avoid the morning and mid-day summertime heat. Better yet, wait until the Fall or Spring.
  • Use water-based products (paints, stains and sealants).

In the Yard:

  • Delay mowing your lawn to another day. Don't mow, let it grow!
  • Avoid using high-emitting, gasoline-powered yard equipment. Electric alternatives are an efficient, environmentally-friendly alternative.
  • Use an electric starter or a "charcoal chimney" to start your barbeque grill. Lighter fluid contains a lot of harmful vapors that escape into our air and contribute to summertime air pollution.

On the Go:

  • Stop at the click when refueling your car. Overfilling your tank often results in fuel spills and always allows unnecessary pollution-causing vapors to escape into our air.
  • Refuel in the evenings after dusk. By refueling after the sun goes down, fuel vapors do not have as much of a chance to "cook" in the mid-day sun and become harmful ground-level ozone.
  • Maintain your vehicle. A poorly-maintained vehicle can pollute as much as 25 times more than a well-maintained one.

To learn more about the summer ozone program, visit:
http://www.ozoneaware.org

Additional Information
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ACTION DAYS: An Action Day for fine particulate matter (particulates), carbon monoxide, ozone or other pollutants indicates that either current air quality is unhealthy or conditions are expected to worsen later in the day or on the next day. Action Days for air pollutants generally indicate that air quality will be in either the Unhealthy or Unhealthy-for-Sensitive-Groups categories according to the Air Quality Index. Action Days trigger voluntary pollution prevention measures, which may vary by season, and public health recommendations. In addition, during the winter 'high pollution day' season (October 31 to March 31), Action Days trigger mandatory restrictions that limit burning inside the home to approved devices only (see indoor burning below).

Action Days for Visibility alone are issued during the winter 'high pollution day' season (October 31 to March 31), only. At the time they are issued (4 PM), action days for visibility indicate that the Visibility Standard Index for visual air quality is expected to be poor on the following day. Action Days for Visibility trigger mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only and voluntary driving reductions for the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area (see indoor burning below).

The VISIBILITY STANDARD INDEX reports the air's visual quality in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area. The visibility standard is 0.076 per kilometer of atmospheric extinction, which means that 7.6 percent of the light in a kilometer of air is blocked. The level must exceed the standard based on a four-hour average for a violation to occur. On the Visibility Standard Index Scale, a value of 101 equates to the 0.076/km standard. Values between 0-50 are good, 51-100 moderate, 101-200 poor and 201-plus extremely poor.

The AIR QUALITY INDEX reports the daily level of air pollution on an hourly basis. The index reports the highest level of either carbon monoxide, fine particulates or ozone depending on which pollutant has the greatest hourly concentration. Values greater than 100 for carbon monoxide, fine particulates and ozone indicate exceedances of the pollutant's state and federal standards. Air Quality Index values between 0-50 are good, 51-100 moderate, 101-150 unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 unhealthy, 201-300 very unhealthy, and over 300 hazardous.

INDOOR BURNING: On Action Days issued during the winter 'high pollution day' season (October 31 through March 31), mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only generally apply to everyone in the entire seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area below 7,000 feet. The restrictions will be enforced through local ordinances or a state regulation.

The state regulation applies to any community in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area that did not have its own mandatory indoor burning ordinance in effect on January 1, 1990. Under this regulation, the only exceptions to the burning restrictions are for residences above 7,000 feet in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area; and those who use Colorado Phase III (Phase II EPA) certified woodburning stoves, Colorado approved pellet stoves, approved masonry heaters or those whose stoves or fireplaces are their primary source of heat. For more information on indoor burning, call the Air Pollution Control Division at (303) 692-3100.
For more, go to: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/ap/woodhome.html

COLORADO OPEN BURN FORECAST: For those with permits for Open Burning, that is burning of waste materials or vegetation outside, check the following webpage to find out if open burning is allowed today:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/burn_forecast.aspx

FOR CURRENT AIR QUALITY INFORMATION AND UPDATES:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/advisory.aspx
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/air_quality.aspx

ABOUT THE AIR QUALITY INDEX:
http://www.epa.gov/airnow/aqi_brochure_08-09.pdf

SOCIAL MEDIA AND AIR QUALITY NOTIFICATIONS:
http://www.facebook.com/cdphe.apcd
http://twitter.com/#!/cdpheapcd
http://www.enviroflash.info/signup.cfm

Winter High Pollution Advisory Program
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The Winter High Pollution Advisory Program is coordinated by the Air Pollution Control Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Winter season air pollution forecasts are issued daily from October 31 through March 31 at 4 p.m. When conditions warrant, forecasts will include information about Action Days and subsequent indoor burning restrictions.

An Action Day for fine particulates, carbon monoxide or ozone indicates that either current air quality is unhealthy or conditions are expected to worsen later in the day or on the next day. Action Days for air pollutants generally indicate that air quality will be in either the Unhealthy or Unhealthy-for-Sensitive-Groups categories according to the Air Quality Index. Action Days trigger mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only (see indoor burning above), voluntary driving reductions, and public health recommendations.

An Action Day for Visibility alone indicates that the Visibility Standard Index for visual air quality is expected to be poor on the current or following day. An Action Day for Visibility will trigger mandatory restrictions on indoor burning and voluntary driving reductions for the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area only (see indoor burning above).

When no advisories are issued, air quality is good or moderate and is expected to remain so during the effective period of the forecast. No restrictions are in place.